Travels by Vine; a Log of Vineyard Visits

Studying wine is fun; visiting vineyards is fantastic! Beyond the philosophical, meaningful and profound, there is an easy pleasure to wine, and a great joy in learning the stories of the vineyards. These stories are meant to be informative and entertaining with no pretense of serendipitous enlightenment nor profound insight. Rather, they are meant to reflect the simple joy that can be found on a grape farm.

Foppiano; a Grape Farm in Sonoma

Foppiano Tasting Room

Foppiano Tasting Room

Family owned for over 100 years, and now run by the 6th generation, Foppiano Vineyards looks and feels more like a grape farm than a winery. It is homey, welcoming and completely unpretentious. With 160 acres in Russian River, the tasting room may be simple, but their wine is serious.

We love Petite Sirah,” is the motto and driving force behind this charming, family-run winery. Petite Sirah is genetically related to Durif, a vitis vinifera grape originally from the south of France. It has since been adopted by America and thrives in Sonoma. Foppiano makes a Lot 96 that is a blend of 75% Petite Sirah, with 15% Zinfandel and 10% Carignan. It is a medium-bodied wine with aromas of almonds, vanilla and red fruit with a clean finish. Foppiano’s Estate Petite Sirah has chewy tannins with flavors of dark fruit and chocolate. Foppiano also makes some lovely Pinot Noir using the Dijon clone. It has bright, crisp cherry flavors and some light pepper with a lingering, earthy finish. Their Sauvignon Blanc is refreshing with tastes of pink grapefruit, lime zest and lemon grass.

Foppiano Vineyards is located in Healdsburg. Their tasting room is open from 11 to 5.

Rodney Strong

Rodney Strong Vineyards

Rodney Strong Vineyards

“I knew I couldn’t be an old dancer, but I could be an old wine maker,” was something Rodney Strong was often heard saying before he passed in 2006. He was a classically trained dancer under George Balanchine and spent four years in Paris. It is there that he fell in love with wine. When he retired from dance in the 1960’s he moved to Sonoma, a then farming community known for rustic wines. Mr. Strong was one of the pioneers who built the wine reputation that Sonoma County enjoys today. Among his contributions to fine Sonoma wines, Mr. Strong was the first to plant Pinot Noir in Russian River and Chardonnay in Chalk Hill, the two grapes for which Sonoma is most known.

After Rodney Strong Vineyards were purchased by Tom Klein in 1989, the winery began practicing sustainable farming. Certified sustainable and solar-generated, Rodney Strong Vineyards practices water and soil conservation and is carbon neutral. “Place is not everything, but place is the most important thing,” is what Tom Klein says when he talks about the terroir of Sonoma and his winery’s stewardship of the land.

Rodney Strong wines are widely distributed and reasonably priced making them fairly accessible. The Sauvignon Blanc has aromas of lemon grass and a slightly bitter, but pleasing grapefruit peal. The Russian River Pinot Noir is earthy, but light with nice strawberry and pepper flavors. The Dry Creek Syrah is tastes like tangy raspberries and oak. The Alexander Valley Cabernet Sauvignon spends 14 months in oak and has great dark fruit aromas and oak with a nice acidity. It is crisp, but anchored in an earthy oak flavor.

Rodney Strong Vineyards is located in Healdsburg. The tasting room is open daily from 10 to 5.

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2 comments on “Travels by Vine; a Log of Vineyard Visits

  1. Marilyn says:

    My husband and I visited Foppiano several years ago, and of course, we had to buy their Petite Sirah. Back then, Mr. Foppiano was still getting around the property in his golf cart.

    I enjoy your blog!

    Marilyn
    winetravelaroundtheworld.com

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